Ahmed Eprahem is pretty much a typical middle-class Egyptian teen. He attends high school, works a side job, lives with his family in the same home he grew up in, hangs out in coffee shops and along the Nile, and isn’t shy about showing his romantic side. At 17, he’s also a champion kung fu competitor, which he quit after badly injuring an opponent.

He also belongs to “Egy Cripz”, explaining that he and his friends’ interest in the Crips, and imitating their look and codes, is more about its association with West Coast hip hop than gang culture.

Read the full story and see the full photo gallery on Turnstyle News.

An Egyptian Activist Battered In Tahrir Considers Boycott

Monday was the largest turnout in recent memory for the first round of voting in Egypt’s first parliamentary elections since the ouster of Hosni Mubarak.

Meet Saleh, an activist who, during the clashes with police in Tahrir, was arrested and later released along with other protestors. He describes his experience as “fortunate” when compared to the fates of those killed in Tahrir as well as the thousands who remain in military detention.

Read and see more on Egypt’s revolution on Turnstyle News»

It has been 10 months since the ouster of Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak, but those in Tahrir Square this week are experiencing an eerie repeat of the January uprisings: bloody and sometimes deadly clashes with riot police, clouds of tear gas, thousands of injuries, and speeches from a ruler who appears days, at minimum, behind the pulse of the street. As Field Marshal Mohamed Hussein Tantawi, Egypt’s interim military ruler, gave a highly anticipated address touching on the political turmoil, riot police continued to assault protesters, rapid fire style, with tear gas canisters. In response to demands that the military council (Security Council of Armed Forces) cease running the country, Tantawi suggested the matter be decided in a public referendum – which drew widespread criticism from politicians and activists. Soon after news of Tantawi’s speech spread through Tahrir, people chanted, “Leave, leave.”
Read our continuous coverage on events in Egypt as reported by Turnstyle News reporter Shadi Rahimi.

It has been 10 months since the ouster of Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak, but those in Tahrir Square this week are experiencing an eerie repeat of the January uprisings: bloody and sometimes deadly clashes with riot police, clouds of tear gas, thousands of injuries, and speeches from a ruler who appears days, at minimum, behind the pulse of the street. As Field Marshal Mohamed Hussein Tantawi, Egypt’s interim military ruler, gave a highly anticipated address touching on the political turmoil, riot police continued to assault protesters, rapid fire style, with tear gas canisters. In response to demands that the military council (Security Council of Armed Forces) cease running the country, Tantawi suggested the matter be decided in a public referendum – which drew widespread criticism from politicians and activists. Soon after news of Tantawi’s speech spread through Tahrir, people chanted, “Leave, leave.”

Read our continuous coverage on events in Egypt as reported by Turnstyle News reporter Shadi Rahimi.

Civilian members of Egypt’s government have offered to step down after large scale conflicts in Cairo’s Tahrir Square this weekend.
Months of exasperation with Egypt’s military rule erupted into violence on Sunday as protesters  faced off with soldiers.
As Egyptian troops attempted to clear the square, protesters resisted and were tear-gassed by soldiers. Rocks were flung back and forth. There are also allegations that live ammunition was used, and it’s being reported that at least 24 people have been killed.
Elections are scheduled a week from Monday, but protesters have long been demanding civilian government rule.
View contributor Shadi Rahimi’s photos from this weekend on Turnstyle News. 

Civilian members of Egypt’s government have offered to step down after large scale conflicts in Cairo’s Tahrir Square this weekend.

Months of exasperation with Egypt’s military rule erupted into violence on Sunday as protesters  faced off with soldiers.

As Egyptian troops attempted to clear the square, protesters resisted and were tear-gassed by soldiers. Rocks were flung back and forth. There are also allegations that live ammunition was used, and it’s being reported that at least 24 people have been killed.

Elections are scheduled a week from Monday, but protesters have long been demanding civilian government rule.

View contributor Shadi Rahimi’s photos from this weekend on Turnstyle News. 

Days after dozens of Coptic Christians died in protests in Cairo, Egypt’s military rulers have responded to the incident publicly.

Less publicized is the plight of the protesters who’ve been detained after continuing their demonstrations in Cairo’s Tahrir Square. Nearly 12,000 civilians have been tried in military tribunals since the beginning of the year, and there’s fear among many young protesters about what’s happened to their comrades. One protester moved her campaign to Facebook after street crackdowns became too severe. This is her story.

This photo series shows a glimpse into two very different parts of  Egypt: the bustling city of Cairo and the small village of Belquas. The  photographs from Belquas show some of the young people who live in the  village, which hosted an open mic series last month brought to them from  organizers in Cairo. The photographs from Cairo document the beginning  of the infamous sit-in protests in Tahrir Square, which lasted three  weeks and ended the first day of Ramadan, August first, when the  military police forcibly removed protestors and their camps. Two days  later, the country watched the trial of ousted president Hosni Mubarak  and his sons on television. The military police remain in the Square  today to keep protestors from returning.
See and learn more on Turnstyle»

This photo series shows a glimpse into two very different parts of Egypt: the bustling city of Cairo and the small village of Belquas. The photographs from Belquas show some of the young people who live in the village, which hosted an open mic series last month brought to them from organizers in Cairo. The photographs from Cairo document the beginning of the infamous sit-in protests in Tahrir Square, which lasted three weeks and ended the first day of Ramadan, August first, when the military police forcibly removed protestors and their camps. Two days later, the country watched the trial of ousted president Hosni Mubarak and his sons on television. The military police remain in the Square today to keep protestors from returning.

See and learn more on Turnstyle»