Teddy Bear Detective Sleuths Up Kickstarter Clams
Let me cop to a weakness up front: the first story I ever wrote, in the third grade, was about a dectective. A detective who just so happened to be a teddy bear.
So when Alexander Zalben and Josh Kenfield’s campaign to publish their Detective Honeybear comic on Kickstarter I couldn’t help but notice. Detective Honeybear and the Mystery of the Terrible Llamas is an all-ages comic about the titular teddy bear who lives in a “noir mystery world” solving crimes while speaking in an almost incomprehensible teddy bear patois.
Go read it already…

Teddy Bear Detective Sleuths Up Kickstarter Clams

Let me cop to a weakness up front: the first story I ever wrote, in the third grade, was about a dectective. A detective who just so happened to be a teddy bear.

So when Alexander Zalben and Josh Kenfield’s campaign to publish their Detective Honeybear comic on Kickstarter I couldn’t help but notice. Detective Honeybear and the Mystery of the Terrible Llamas is an all-ages comic about the titular teddy bear who lives in a “noir mystery world” solving crimes while speaking in an almost incomprehensible teddy bear patois.

Go read it already…

Animating The Stories Of Our Lives: The Rauch Brothers [Interview]
StoryCorps, the national oral history project in partnership with the  Library of Congress and NPR, has been recording the stories of everyday  people across America for nearly a decade.  Through its podcasts, books  and weekly broadcasts on NPR’s Morning Edition, the organization is on a  mission to prove that there is no better way to honor our selves and  our loved ones than by listening.  Unless, of course, you like to watch  while you listen, too.  Mike and Tim Rauch are helping this American  institution retell some of its most compelling stories through animation  — and their work is catching on. The Rauch Brothers were recently  nominated for a Emmy Award for their animated work and Turnstyle  contributor Jeremy Helton interviewed the duo in September of 2011.
Read this interview and view a photo essay of the Rauch Brothers’ work on Turnstyle»
Animating The Stories Of Our Lives: The Rauch Brothers [Interview]

StoryCorps, the national oral history project in partnership with the Library of Congress and NPR, has been recording the stories of everyday people across America for nearly a decade.  Through its podcasts, books and weekly broadcasts on NPR’s Morning Edition, the organization is on a mission to prove that there is no better way to honor our selves and our loved ones than by listening.  Unless, of course, you like to watch while you listen, too.  Mike and Tim Rauch are helping this American institution retell some of its most compelling stories through animation — and their work is catching on. The Rauch Brothers were recently nominated for a Emmy Award for their animated work and Turnstyle contributor Jeremy Helton interviewed the duo in September of 2011.

Read this interview and view a photo essay of the Rauch Brothers’ work on Turnstyle»

DC’s Epic Dark Fantasy: Paul Cornell Talks ‘Demon Knights’
Paul Cornell calls Demon Knights a “medieval Magnificent Seven”.  The book puts the classic Jack Kirby creation “Etrigan the Demon” — an  ill-tempered fiend with a penchant for rhyming bound by the wizard  Merlin to the mortal Jason Blood, a knight of King Arthur’s Round Table —  at the center of a motley group of characters in the medieval age. Ten  years ago, the idea of a medieval fantasy ensemble book being part of  the vanguard of a publishing initiative would have seemed preposterous.  Yet, in the wake of the Lord of the Rings films, fantasy has never been stronger as a genre, and dark fantasy is newly ascendant.
“If you watch Game of Thrones,” says Cornell, “or if you play Dragon Age, you’ll know where we are. That kind of harsh modern take on medieval fantasy.”
Read more on Turnstyle»
DC’s Epic Dark Fantasy: Paul Cornell Talks ‘Demon Knights’

Paul Cornell calls Demon Knights a “medieval Magnificent Seven”. The book puts the classic Jack Kirby creation “Etrigan the Demon” — an ill-tempered fiend with a penchant for rhyming bound by the wizard Merlin to the mortal Jason Blood, a knight of King Arthur’s Round Table — at the center of a motley group of characters in the medieval age. Ten years ago, the idea of a medieval fantasy ensemble book being part of the vanguard of a publishing initiative would have seemed preposterous. Yet, in the wake of the Lord of the Rings films, fantasy has never been stronger as a genre, and dark fantasy is newly ascendant.

“If you watch Game of Thrones,” says Cornell, “or if you play Dragon Age, you’ll know where we are. That kind of harsh modern take on medieval fantasy.”

Read more on Turnstyle»

The buzz around the relaunch of DC Comics’ entire line of superhero  comics has been huge, with practically every major national news  organization covering the release of Justice League #1 last  week. Yet, that release is just the first of the slate of 52 new and  relaunched series which will debut this month. While a team book  starring DC’s best known heroes is the closest thing the company had to a  sure thing, the publisher is reaching down deep in the hopes of  building a new hit series, and rekindling long lost favorites.
Read more on Turnstyle»

The buzz around the relaunch of DC Comics’ entire line of superhero comics has been huge, with practically every major national news organization covering the release of Justice League #1 last week. Yet, that release is just the first of the slate of 52 new and relaunched series which will debut this month. While a team book starring DC’s best known heroes is the closest thing the company had to a sure thing, the publisher is reaching down deep in the hopes of building a new hit series, and rekindling long lost favorites.

Read more on Turnstyle»

What story plays in your head when you listen to your favorite  Smiths song? Shawn Demumbrum, a Phoenix, Arizona comic publisher, has  not only brought this idea to life, he’s premiering it at the next  Comic-Con in Tucson.
Demumbrum is funding the project via Kickstarter.  His original funding goal was $3,000, and he’s now raised close to  double that amount. The contribution will pay for printing costs and  ISBN codes, as well as licensing song lyrics from the Smiths themselves.
SEE MORE PHOTOS & READ OUR INTERVIEW WITH DEMUMBRUM»

What story plays in your head when you listen to your favorite Smiths song? Shawn Demumbrum, a Phoenix, Arizona comic publisher, has not only brought this idea to life, he’s premiering it at the next Comic-Con in Tucson.

Demumbrum is funding the project via Kickstarter. His original funding goal was $3,000, and he’s now raised close to double that amount. The contribution will pay for printing costs and ISBN codes, as well as licensing song lyrics from the Smiths themselves.

SEE MORE PHOTOS & READ OUR INTERVIEW WITH DEMUMBRUM»