REVOLT TV: MUSIC TELEVISION FOR A NEW GENERATION

When I discovered Revolt TV a few weeks back, I got really excited because it was being marketed as if it was a television network that would highlight social issues and also showcase dope music. But when I realized Sean Diddy Combs was spearheading the project, I cringed, thinking to myself, “I hope this doesn’t turn out to become another BET”.
Diddy is already known for his marketing expertise, so I was really interested in seeing how he would approach this new venture. He’ll have to make sure that it doesn’t become “Diddy TV,” seeing as how he becomes the face of everything he touches. In order to maintain the “grassroots” appeal the network is aiming for, it would be best if Diddy wasn’t the first thing that came to mind when thinking of Revolt TV.

So far, company reps have already begun the highlighting of social issues. During the Trayvon Martin trial, Revolt’s Twitter feed was flooded with conversation starters that create discussion and spreads awareness.The tweets took a strong stand in support of the Martin family, and went so far as to change their name on Twitter from #RevoltTV to #TrayvonTrial.
Another great awareness building concept from RevoltTV can be seen on itsofficial Instagram page. They put up inspirational quotes from great leaders like Stokely Carmichael (Kwame Ture), Malcolm X, and Nelson Mandela, including this cool one from KRS-One:
The platform has also delivered on the music side of things, already interviewing some of the key players behind Jay-Z’s newest album, Magna Carta Holy Grail. Revolt was also one of the very first outlets on top of all the buzz generated byKendrick Lamar’s verse on Big Sean’s “control”. This is where Diddy and his network definitely have the upper hand on other music outlets.
“I would say this journey started me for seven years ago when MTV stopped playing music and that had a huge impact on the future of music,” Diddy told a packed house of industry execs at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity. “There was also no place that was covering music in the way that if you follow sports you go to ESPN, or like CNN with news, but with music you were just thrown into the abyss.”
Revolt TV plans on doing way more than just becoming the next MTV. As one of the first networks of the social media age, Revolt TV will be multi-platform, running across television, online, and mobile, and of course, partner with leading social media networks like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Youtube.
It’s always tough being the first to do anything, and with the shrinking attention spans of our generation, Revolt will either be a model of how to harness the power of the digital age or a how-to guide on becoming the Google Plus of television.
REVOLT TV: MUSIC TELEVISION FOR A NEW GENERATION

When I discovered Revolt TV a few weeks back, I got really excited because it was being marketed as if it was a television network that would highlight social issues and also showcase dope music. But when I realized Sean Diddy Combs was spearheading the project, I cringed, thinking to myself, “I hope this doesn’t turn out to become another BET”.

Diddy is already known for his marketing expertise, so I was really interested in seeing how he would approach this new venture. He’ll have to make sure that it doesn’t become “Diddy TV,” seeing as how he becomes the face of everything he touches. In order to maintain the “grassroots” appeal the network is aiming for, it would be best if Diddy wasn’t the first thing that came to mind when thinking of Revolt TV.

So far, company reps have already begun the highlighting of social issues. During the Trayvon Martin trial, Revolt’s Twitter feed was flooded with conversation starters that create discussion and spreads awareness.The tweets took a strong stand in support of the Martin family, and went so far as to change their name on Twitter from #RevoltTV to #TrayvonTrial.

Another great awareness building concept from RevoltTV can be seen on itsofficial Instagram page. They put up inspirational quotes from great leaders like Stokely Carmichael (Kwame Ture), Malcolm X, and Nelson Mandela, including this cool one from KRS-One:

The platform has also delivered on the music side of things, already interviewing some of the key players behind Jay-Z’s newest album, Magna Carta Holy Grail. Revolt was also one of the very first outlets on top of all the buzz generated byKendrick Lamar’s verse on Big Sean’s “control”. This is where Diddy and his network definitely have the upper hand on other music outlets.

“I would say this journey started me for seven years ago when MTV stopped playing music and that had a huge impact on the future of music,” Diddy told a packed house of industry execs at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity. “There was also no place that was covering music in the way that if you follow sports you go to ESPN, or like CNN with news, but with music you were just thrown into the abyss.”

Revolt TV plans on doing way more than just becoming the next MTV. As one of the first networks of the social media age, Revolt TV will be multi-platform, running across television, online, and mobile, and of course, partner with leading social media networks like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Youtube.

It’s always tough being the first to do anything, and with the shrinking attention spans of our generation, Revolt will either be a model of how to harness the power of the digital age or a how-to guide on becoming the Google Plus of television.

SPIKE LEE: FUNDED
With just four days to go Spike Lee’s Kickstarter campaign for an untitled movie about addiction to blood (but it’s not a “Blacula” remake, he swears!) hascleared its goal of 1.25 million dollars.
It’s been a grind for the legendary director, but the success shows that staying nimble on your messaging feet and staying in the game every day can lead to success. Lee hasn’t even had to divulge that much more information about the film itself, although casting notes and promo images have illuminated some of his vision without divulging any surprises.
SPIKE LEE: FUNDED

With just four days to go Spike Lee’s Kickstarter campaign for an untitled movie about addiction to blood (but it’s not a “Blacula” remake, he swears!) hascleared its goal of 1.25 million dollars.

It’s been a grind for the legendary director, but the success shows that staying nimble on your messaging feet and staying in the game every day can lead to success. Lee hasn’t even had to divulge that much more information about the film itself, although casting notes and promo images have illuminated some of his vision without divulging any surprises.

DIGITAL DJING LOOKS GOOD ON PAPER – AND IT WORKS

Kate Stone has advanced some futuristic technology, turning simple construction paper into turntables that actually play music.

Youth Radio and Turnstyle had the honor of hosting this inventor who wants to change the way we think about electronics. It’s awe-inspiring to watch Stone’s as-yet-unnamed creation in action: you touch your simulated turntables on a piece of paper, and you’re controlling the DJ app on the iPad sitting five feet away from you. Every function that’s available on an analog turntable, including blending songs and scratching records, is also possible with Stone’s technology.

Besides just music, this technology has promise for other fields like education, where it could help meet literacy gaps.
Say a child is learning how to read, and he doesn’t understand a particular word. He could run his fingers over a sentence printed on Stone’s paper, hooked up to speakers,

and it could offer pronunciation help. Of course, there are some apps for the iPad and other tablets that can do this already. But when you think globally about needs in developing countries, this technology is much cheaper than buying iPads. - Kent Foster

It seems that every month brings a big new development in San Francisco’s tech scene, and with those developments comes more outcry that the city’s working class isn’t seeing the benefits of the re-configuring economy. This is a reprise of what happened during San Francisco’s first dot com boom. Many young people who are part of the new economy see the transformation as natural and necessary, while others say it’s disastrous for the city.

Reporter/Producer- Nishat Kurwa @nishatjaan @turnstylenews
Video Producer - Chaz Hubbard

Conference Aims To Jumpstart Tech Founders, and Industry Diversity

San Francisco Bay Area residents, techie or not, are swimming in the wisdom of startup culture, with its cognescenti profiting handsomely from the books and blogs that form the canon in their industry. But the organizers of a conference held this week in San Francisco are betting that there are a lot of tech entrepreneurs who could use more high-touch exposure to that advice, and in turn, that the industry will benefit from engaging those same startup founders.  

Conference Aims To Jumpstart Tech Founders, and Industry Diversity

San Francisco Bay Area residents, techie or not, are swimming in the wisdom of startup culture, with its cognescenti profiting handsomely from the books and blogs that form the canon in their industry. But the organizers of a conference held this week in San Francisco are betting that there are a lot of tech entrepreneurs who could use more high-touch exposure to that advice, and in turn, that the industry will benefit from engaging those same startup founders.  

The Seven Seals of The TVpocalypseby Noah J. Nelson
The future of technology is beginning to look a lot like the past. Specifically it’s beginning to look like television. In form and function.
In the past few years there has been an explosion in smart TVs and stand-alone set-top boxes. Nary a Blu-Ray player in sight doesn’t ship with Netflix and Pandora. Roku has a whole business based around their streaming box, and while Apple keeps calling the Apple TV a “hobby” they’re selling millions of the hockey pucks. One of the reasons that the current generation of gaming consoles has managed to last so long is because of the rollout of video features like Netflix, Amazon Video, and HBO Go to the game platforms.
All of this is just what is possible today.
By this time next year we’re going to be in the midst of a TVpocalypse. The opening moves of what just might be the Last War for the Living Room are upon us. Stare with me into the depths of the Internet and see the dread portents of the age to come.
Unleash the prophecy at Turnstyle!
Photo Illustration after Google.

The Seven Seals of The TVpocalypse
by Noah J. Nelson

The future of technology is beginning to look a lot like the past. Specifically it’s beginning to look like television. In form and function.

In the past few years there has been an explosion in smart TVs and stand-alone set-top boxes. Nary a Blu-Ray player in sight doesn’t ship with Netflix and Pandora. Roku has a whole business based around their streaming box, and while Apple keeps calling the Apple TV a “hobby” they’re selling millions of the hockey pucks. One of the reasons that the current generation of gaming consoles has managed to last so long is because of the rollout of video features like Netflix, Amazon Video, and HBO Go to the game platforms.

All of this is just what is possible today.

By this time next year we’re going to be in the midst of a TVpocalypse. The opening moves of what just might be the Last War for the Living Room are upon us. Stare with me into the depths of the Internet and see the dread portents of the age to come.

Unleash the prophecy at Turnstyle!

Photo Illustration after Google.