An Egyptian Activist Battered In Tahrir Considers Boycott

Monday was the largest turnout in recent memory for the first round of voting in Egypt’s first parliamentary elections since the ouster of Hosni Mubarak.

Meet Saleh, an activist who, during the clashes with police in Tahrir, was arrested and later released along with other protestors. He describes his experience as “fortunate” when compared to the fates of those killed in Tahrir as well as the thousands who remain in military detention.

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This photo series shows a glimpse into two very different parts of  Egypt: the bustling city of Cairo and the small village of Belquas. The  photographs from Belquas show some of the young people who live in the  village, which hosted an open mic series last month brought to them from  organizers in Cairo. The photographs from Cairo document the beginning  of the infamous sit-in protests in Tahrir Square, which lasted three  weeks and ended the first day of Ramadan, August first, when the  military police forcibly removed protestors and their camps. Two days  later, the country watched the trial of ousted president Hosni Mubarak  and his sons on television. The military police remain in the Square  today to keep protestors from returning.
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This photo series shows a glimpse into two very different parts of Egypt: the bustling city of Cairo and the small village of Belquas. The photographs from Belquas show some of the young people who live in the village, which hosted an open mic series last month brought to them from organizers in Cairo. The photographs from Cairo document the beginning of the infamous sit-in protests in Tahrir Square, which lasted three weeks and ended the first day of Ramadan, August first, when the military police forcibly removed protestors and their camps. Two days later, the country watched the trial of ousted president Hosni Mubarak and his sons on television. The military police remain in the Square today to keep protestors from returning.

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